THE BEST WAY TO CALM THE CLIENT

Have a fitting prior to the shoot. I know that this isn’t always possible due to budget restraints, but if there is any wiggle room to make this happen, I promise it will make it so the client and the agency will sleep better at night. Let me explain.

We now all have these cameras in our pockets and it’s pretty easy to take pictures whenever we want. I often get asked to take photos of the wardrobe prior to the shoot so that the client and/or agency can see what I’m buying. This is either done by taking photos of the clothing while I’m out shopping or I do it when I get back to my house by arranging the clothing on hangers into outfits on a peg board. There are a couple of problems with this. A) Taking photos while I’m shopping when there is so limited time slows me down. It will make it so that you have less options because I ate valuable time taking sad looking pictures of wrinkly garments under bad lighting while I was in the store. B) It’s hard for me to live quietly under the radar at a store when I’m stopping to take photos. They might get uncomfortable and ask me to leave. Now I can’t source from a place that has good options. C) Clothing that is on the hanger has no life. It never looks as good as when it is on the talent. D) Fit is everything. I can show you a great outfit, but it means nothing unless we know it fits the talent. I might be showing you a top that everyone loves on the hanger, but we find out on the day of the shoot that it doesn’t fit the talent. Then we’re back to square one. We truly don’t know anything until we see how it works on the talent.

I would say that 60% of my jobs I get asked to photograph the wardrobe before the shoot and I find that 90% of the time it only confuses the client. For example, I once had to shop for an actor that was 6’6” and 240 pounds. When I presented his wardrobe as photographed on the hanger, the client’s feedback was that the clothing looked baggy. They weren’t wrong, an XXL sweater on a hanger looks like a blanket holding onto a pin. It’s hard to know from the photo what my intentions were for that garment. Now the client is worried, and it’s only because photographing clothing without people in it and having it look good is nearly impossible.

Fittings solve a lot of problems. You get to try things on the actors to make sure it fits AND you get to nail down some looks prior to the shoot, which later saves time on the shoot day. Granted, you can’t guarantee the looks picked out during the fitting are absolute options because there are issues that can come up when they’re on set, but it really helps narrow down the options and gives everyone a better idea of where we’re are. It also allows me to go shop after the fitting if we’re not feeling great about the options presented so that we know we absolutely have what is needed by the end of the fitting. Now we can all sleep soundly the night before the shoot that we nailed the wardrobe.