THE SECRET TO A SWIFT RETURN DAY

You need to shop with having your returns in mind. There has to be a plan to the madness or else you’ll pay for it on the back end. You can’t just go all willy nilly, going in out of stores, grabbing things here and there, going back to the same store to grab things in different sizes, repeat. This will make the wrap day of your job a disaster.

Your return day will be easy if you plan out your shopping day. Depending on the size of the job, I also recommend dividing your receipts by gender for each store. If I need to shop for both men and women at Zara, I’ll checkout once for the women, then once for the men. If I need to back to Zara for more women’s clothing, I’ll put a little mark with a sharpie on the tag of each of the items from the receipt. This way when I got return the items, I can easily divide the pile without having to manually look at sku’s. Sku’s are the worst and will make your eyes cross if you have to go through racks of clothing.

At department stores like Macy’s, Nordstroms and Bloomingdales I will keep each receipt to the particular department. For instance, women’s clothing from level 2 on one receipt, women’s petite’s on another, men’s dress shirts and ties on another. That way when you go bag returns at the end of the job you can easily break it down.

You also need to know what stores allow you to return by credit card or store sticker. This allows you to return items from multiple receipts all at once because they can either look it up by one credit card or by the store sticker that’s on the tag. Target and Kohl’s allow you to return everything by using your credit card to look up the receipts. Nordstrom, Macy’s and Bloomingdales only need the sticker that is on the tag. You’ll walk away with one return receipt, which makes paperwork a whole lot easier.

This job can be challenging with the sheer volume of items you need to purchase. Organization is everything. It’s what will make or break your sanity. You need to have a system set up for how you execute your shopping and returns or else you’ll burn out after doing multiple jobs in a row. Having a system will reduce your stress and allow you to focus on the meat of the job that’s important. Cross those t’s and dot those i’s.

HOW TO SET UP YOUR $$ AS A FREELANCER

I like to describe being freelance as being professionally unemployed. You have no idea when the next job is coming and you need to financially set yourself up as if the job you’re currently on could be the last. It’s an absolute must that you keep your overhead as low as you possibly can in the beginning. You can do this by living in the cheapest place you can while still being safe, not having car payments, and going out to eat as little as possible. You need your money to last because it might take you longer than expected to start having regular jobs.

What you can’t do is get a side job to cover you (at least in the photo/commercial industry). This is the kiss of death. You can’t turn down last minute opportunities to freelance because you have to bartend that night. This especially goes when you’re first starting out. People are only going to reach out to you once or twice before they give up on you if you’re unavailable. You need to ALWAYS BE AVAILABLE. This means that you’ll be living on a set sum in your bank account for a while because don’t forget, you’re now professionally unemployed. I can’t stress this enough, you have to be ultra thrifty in the beginning.

If you want to be a stylist you need to start working on your credit. Open a card and start charging everything but only if you can fully pay it off at the end of every month. This is CRUCIAL. Start building that credit score so you can start working on raising your credit card limit.

You should have one card for personal expenses and one card for business expenses. Don’t cross your purchases on your cards because you want to keep the two separate for tax reasons. You can charge all of your write offs to your business credit card. A stylist can write off things like purchases for their kit, ink for their printer, sneakers for when they work, gas for their car, etc. It’s easier if you practice keeping your business expenses from your personal expenses from the get go. You’ll be happier when you need to organize for your taxes.

Start using an accounting/invoicing site like Quickbooks or Freshbooks. Again, your life will be easier down the road if you do this as early as you can. You want to be super organized with your finances and keep track of your invoices. You’re going to be scraping at every penny in the beginning and you don’t want to lose any of that hard earned cash by being sloppy.

Put aside a third of your check for taxes. The best way to do this is to set up an account with your bank that automatically withdraws every month to a savings account dedicated to your taxes. You don’t want to have to scramble at the end of the year.

Find a good accountant. Ask your fellow freelance friends. People are always excited to share who they are using. Make sure you find an accountant that deals with other freelancers in your industry. If you don’t, your accountant isn’t going to be aware of all of the write-offs and they’re going to charge you more to file your taxes.

Health insurance is a must. Being on set can sometimes be dangerous. If you hurt yourself and end up in the hospital, you may need to get a full time job and have to say goodbye to your freelancing life to pay the bills. This is a necessary bill to pay every month.

It’s a good idea to have a car. You don’t want to turn down a job because it’s out in the suburbs and you have no way to get there. It’s also a must to have a car if you’re a stylist assistant. The cheaper the car, the better. You don’t want to have to make car payments. You just need to get from point A to point B.

Lastly, maybe not in the first year, but eventually you will want to contribute to an IRA. This is how you will be able to retire. The sooner you do it only increases the chances you won’t have to work until you’re 90.

All of these suggestions don’t need to be in place before you take your first freelancing gig, but they are all things that you should be actively working towards in your first year if you hope to continue freelancing. The sooner you get your ducks in the row, the greater your chances you’ll have at having a fruitful freelancing career.